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    (340)514-4873
    Very seasonal. Get here early for the best selection! Saturdays 10am-12noon
  • Farmer/Artists

    Local artists Luca & Christina Gasperi run ARTfarm, a small local vegetable farm and art gallery. Together with a small staff we grow a variety of salad greens, heirloom tomatoes, herbs, veggies, and tropical fruits. We welcome volunteers who want to learn about our organic growing methods.
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A Little of This, Lots of That, feat. TOMATOES! 10am – 12 noon

  

ARTfarm zinnias at dawn.

 
 

The sheep tend to graze more heavily in the dawn hours, when things are cool and there is still some dew on the grass.

  

When it’s still too dark to start harvesting, some work begins with organizing for the market.

 Good Morning! Here’s what we’ll have today down the South Shore, in rough order of quantity:

A LITTLE BIT OF: micro spicy, teen arugula, summer squash, wild cucumbers, fresh baby ginger, kale, escarole, lettuce heads, fresh Mediterranean figs. 
RESPECTABLE SUPPLY OF: heirloom tomatoes, pumpkin, onions, scallions, radishes, carrots, lemon basil, holy basil, dill, cilantro, recao, garlic chives, Italian parsley, edible yellow marigold flowers, fresh local neighborhood eggs from happy hens at Yellow Door Farm (Heather & Matthew) and Nelthropp Naturals (Jimmy & Barbara), passionfruit.

BOATLOADS OF: sweet salad mix, cherry tomatoes, slicing tomatoes, green bell peppers, red serranos, Indian chili peppers, Italian basil, fresh-cut zinnia flowers!

ARTfarm Wednesday 3-6pm Goat Cheese!

 

Gorgeous red and white onions with full green tops! Freshly harvested this morning for you.

We’ve got a fresh batch of Fiddlewood Farm goat cheese for early birds again today! Beautiful fresh goat cheese medallions, locally made, creamy and sweet! We made a beautiful pizza for dinner last night featuring Bethany’s awesome goat cheese, ARTfarm basil, kale, peppers and onions… Yum! If you don’t feel like baking your own pizza, check out the new Italian restaurant (at Five Corners next to Car Zone), Un Amore, from Frank and Katherine Pugliese. They are buying ARTfarm produce for their kitchen as well as featuring Fiddlewood farms goat cheese in their signature ravioli dish. 

Today at the stand: Sweet salad mix, very limited amounts of teen arugula and teen spicy, slicing tomatoes, heirloom tomatoes, cherry tomatoes;

Small amounts of summer squash, green bell peppers, and kale;

Escarole, radishes, onions, lettuce heads, pumpkin, red and green serrano and Indian chili peppers;

Italian basil, lemon basil, Thai basil, holy basil, cilantro, dill, garlic chives, parsley;

Loads of zinnia flowers! And from Fiddlewood Farm, fresh local goat cheese!

We are located on the S. Shore Rd. between Ha’Penny Beach and the Boy Scout Camp. We look forward to seeing you this afternoon!

ARTfarm Abundance 10am – 12noon Saturday 

The drought conditions drastically reduced our beneficial insect population; we planted wildflower mixes in the gardens to try and boost their numbers. A side effect of this farming technique is the beautiful flowers.

The drought conditions drastically reduced our beneficial insect population; we planted wildflower mixes in the gardens to try and boost their numbers. A side effect of this farming technique is the beautiful flowers.

We are a small, highly diversified family farm. We grow smallish amounts of many things, of the highest possible quality. This is an intensive and time consuming way to farm but it is also highly biodiverse and, we feel, sustainable.

Because we often have limited quantities of certain items, we encourage customers looking for specific items to try and come near the beginning of our farmstand hours. Additionally, due to reduced rainfall over the last year and reduced growing capacity, we are only open two instead of three days a week this year. This often results in a line of customers at the entrance prior to opening. We appreciate your dedication to good food.

Let’s all try to maintain a sense of abundance as we go through our day. There is enough good food for everyone. We are all more fulfilled when we can share what we have with our neighbors around us. Let’s all take a breath and appreciate all the blessings we can be grateful for.

Today’s abundance: Sweet salad mix, arugula, spicy salad mix, and lettuce heads;

Cherry tomatoes, sturdy slicing and delicate please-handle-gently heirloom tomatoes, summer squash, pumpkins in all different shapes and types, green bell peppers, kale, scallions, onions, carrots, radishes, a handful of wild cucumbers;

The Seminole and other small pumpkins are finally ready! The plump seeds are delicious roasted with olive oil and a generous pinch of sea salt, don't forget them!

The Seminole and other small pumpkins are finally ready! The plump seeds are delicious roasted with olive oil and a generous pinch of sea salt, don’t forget them!

Red and green serrano peppers, red and green Indian chilies, cilantro, dill, garlic chives, parsley, Italian basil, lemon basil, holy basil, rosemary, ginger root, a few passionfruit, loads of zinnia flowers, loads of edible marigold flowers, wildflowers, and a few bags of figs​.

The drought has pushed us to do a lot of experimentation on the farm this year. Our rain catchment ponds are suffering from algae overgrowth and increased evaporation. We are trialing different floating aquatic plants to serve as an eco-friendly and economic pond cover. This fuzzy friend is called Salvinia.

The drought has pushed us to do a lot of experimentation on the farm this year. Our rain catchment ponds are suffering from algae overgrowth and increased evaporation. We are trialing different floating aquatic plants to serve as an eco-friendly and economic pond cover. This fuzzy friend is called Salvinia.

ARTfarm Wednesday Goat Cheese! 3-6pm

Early birds can snap up one of a few ‘medallions’ of locally made goat cheese at the stand today. This is a super fresh premium product from local farmer and vet Dr. Bethany Bradford! Delicious on salads, in many dishes, and delicate enough for desserts!

  Sweet salad mix, baby and regular arugula, baby and regular spicy salad mix;

Loads of cherry tomatoes, slicing tomatoes, some heirloom tomatoes, summer squash, three types of kale, escarole, carrots, scallions, and pumpkin;

Italian basil, lemon basil, holy basil, dill, cilantro, recao, parsley, garlic chives, edible yellow marigolds, big beautiful zinnia flowers, hot serrano and Indian chili peppers, jojo plums and a few passionfruit. 

There will be more sweet corn in a few weeks.

She’s our farm vet, the VI Territorial Director of Veterinary Services for the Department of Agriculture and a fellow farmer: Dr. Bethany Bradford has spent the last several years building up her Alpine dairy goat herd on St. Croix at Fiddlewood Farm. She also bred and raised her own livestock guardian dogs to keep her herd safe (one of her pups joined our sheep flock in 2012!). Her hilly, partially wooded farm lined with fiddlewood trees on the edge of the rainforest offers lots of shady play room and browse for her goats. Her tidy cheerful milking parlor and nearby cheese room are immaculate. Originally from Maine, Dr. Bradford has lived on St. Croix for nearly thirty years, is actively involved with the Women’s Coalition and works part time in Dr. Duke Deller’s Animal Clinic. 

Dr. Bradford’s beautiful, frisky alpine dairy goats wander pasture and forest areas at Fiddlewood Farm.

  

Local goat cheese medallions from Fiddlewood Farm in Estate Plessen! Dainty, light and super fresh. Plain, herbed, or with pepper.

 

You are a Chef! ARTfarm Saturday 10 AM – 12 noon

 

Keeping ARTfarm spotless! The fig trees are currently covered with young spotless red ladybugs, controlling pests naturally.

 Tomorrow morning we have lots of goodies! New and exciting: heirloom tomatoes, fresh baby ginger and turmeric, onions, pumpkins… Here’s the full list for Saturday:

Sweet salad mix, baby and regular arugula, baby and regular spicy salad mix;

Loads of cherry tomatoes, slicing tomatoes, the beginning of our heirloom tomatoes, small amounts of sweet corn, summer squash, cucumbers, three types of kale, escarole, carrots, green bell peppers, scallions, a few bunches of onions, and pumpkin;

Italian basil, lemon basil, holy basil, dill, cilantro, recao, parsley, garlic chives, fresh baby ginger root, fresh baby turmeric root, edible yellow marigolds, big beautiful zinnia flowers, hot serrano and Indian chili peppers, jojo plums and a few passionfruit. 

There will be more sweet corn in a few weeks.

On Wednesday at the farmstand we should have some fresh locally made goat cheese chèvres from Fiddlewood Farm. Local veterinarian and fellow farmer Dr. Bethany Bradford has spent the last several years building up her Alpine dairy goat herd on St. Croix! We’ll tell you more in the next post!

You Are A Chef!

A beautiful tuna nicoise salad featuring ARTfarm cherry tomatoes! Thanks Norma H II!

 We love it when people take beautiful pictures of the food they make with our produce. Pictured above, a dish featuring ARTfarm produce prepared by the crew of the M/V Norma H II! This cargo ship out of San Juan visits our Gallows Bay port weekly on its way to St. Thomas and beyond. Give Ian or Brian a shout if you need to move anything large or small interisland, or to and from Puerto Rico. When they’re not busy eating and preparing a healthy diet, the Norma H II crew are here on St. Croix loading cargo on Tuesdays, arriving St. Thomas the following morning. They can move live animals, refrigerated items, large and small items boxed, crated or palletized…just about anything but people!

ARTfarm Wednesday 3–6 Sweet Corn

Today’s farmstand is 3-6pm. We have loads of sweet corn, sweet salad mix, arugula, spicy mix, slicing tomatoes, cherry tomatoes, green bell peppers, cucumbers, summer squash, dill, cilantro, Italian basil, lemon basil, garlic chives, recao, kale, radishes, escarole and zinnia flowers. 

Currently under construction in downtown Christiansted at Market Square, a new restaurant called balter is being developed with Chef Digby Stridiron at the helm. Here is a brief video shot at ARTfarm shortly before the drought began, featuring some of our livestock and gardens! Enjoy, and we look forward to the culinary creativity that will abound at balter, slated to open spring/summer 2016. 

Saturday Treats! 10am-12 noon!

Luca with a nice big escarole on this overcast morning!

Good morning! We will be running two checkout tables again to move the line along this morning; and we haven’t been running out of tomatoes and sweet salad mix by the end of the stand – so come early, come late and get your healthy veggie fix! 10am-12 this morning down the South Shore! Here is the complete list for this morning, plus a few treats from Yellow Door Farm TBA (Wanda can’t make it this morning, but she should be back next week):

Sweet salad mix, baby spicy salad mix, spicy salad mix, baby arugula, arugula;

Loads of red slicing and cherry tomatoes, beautiful sweet corn, carrots, escarole, summer squash, cucumbers, radishes, kale, sweet green bell peppers, scallions;

Green serrano hot peppers, green Indian chili peppers, Italian basil, holy basil, lemon basil, mint, tarragon, cilantro, dill, parsley;

Fresh-cut zinnia flowers, edible marigold flowers, sweet fresh Mediterranean figs, and jumbo-olive-sized jojo plums. 

 

Jojo trees often volunteer where livestock have grazed.

 

Jojo plums have different flavors at different levels of ripeness.

  

Jojo plums are a healthy addition to your diet!

 The jojo plum is a highly drought tolerant, very attractive small pasture tree whose foliage somewhat resembles that of an olive tree in color and texture: its leathery, oval shaped leaves are silver underneath. Jojo trees provide shelter and food to a variety of wildlife and they are a prolific source of nectar and pollen for honeybees, with a citrusy sweet scent when in bloom.

The fruits of the jojo tree can vary in size from tennis ball to olive. Wild jojos tend to bear fruit on the smaller size, while the larger fruit bearing trees have been selected or grafted by horticulturists for larger fruit production. Imported from Asia during the Victorian age, the jojo or jujube is thought to be indigenous to North Africa and Syria, and was well known for thousands of years for its tonic properties in Chinese medicine  – but didn’t seem to catch on in the West. On St. Croix’s South Shore, the jojo plum is well distributed by wildlife. 

Each fruit contains a large pit, so the best way to eat them is to rinse them and then pop an entire plum in your mouth, gently chewing around the pit to remove the flesh. The thin skin is crunchy and edible, like an apple’s. 

Today we have wild jojo plums on offer. Most Jojo enthusiasts prefer a specific level of ripeness depending on their taste. Some folks like the fruit at a late full ripeness when it turns an orangey red color and has a sweet overripeness to it. Others prefer the fruit in the middle, yellow stage, for a pear-like consistency and flavor. Others prefer the crisp brightness of the green fruits, which impart a sour tang not unlike a stateside apple.

Some folks swear by the slightly fermented overripe jojo fruit as a health tonic. At any stage, jojo plums are loaded with vitamin C and other micronutrients that can help keep your immune system in tiptop form. When our farm family catches a winter cold or flu, typically Farmer Luca does not succumb; he attributes this to the daily consumption of jojo plums as he walks around the farm. 

 

Jojos are great trees for honeybees.

  

Be cautious when pasturing poultry near jojo trees. Domestic birds can experience problems if they gorge themselves on too many (the pits can fill the birds’ gizzards too quickly and cause blockage). Sheep wisely spit out the pits!

 

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